What are the Regulatory Standard Depths for Underground Utilities?

GUIDE FOR UNDERTAKING WORK NEAR UNDERGROUND ASSETS

Where a service is inserted into an OOS, retired or abandoned conduit, pipe or duct, the records shall show this information. If assets are sold or disposed of to another owner, then both organizations records should show such information.

SERVICES AROUND POLES

Unless otherwise agreed, underground services and other obstructions around poles are to be kept a minimum distance of 300 mm from the periphery of the pole, to allow inspections by utility/service provider staff.

No excavation within 10 metres of a SWER transformer pole is to occur without the approval of the local electricity company.

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS

General requirements to meet the “guidance material” provisions of this document are set out below to:

• Determine if you have underground services near the worksite;

• Provide hazard and risk identification on the asset;

• Provide appropriate OH&S requirements at a worksite;

• Provide management of the risks associated with damage to the surrounding environment or other services and reduce risk to the public.


Keep in mind that utilities can be buried anywhere.


GAS

How deep are gas pipes buried in Australia?

Pipe buried underground must be at least 450mm deep and covered with marker tape, approximately 150mm above the pipe. If the pipe is buried under a building, there must be no joints in the pipe.

The depth of a gas pipe depends on the pressure/size and the area in which it lays. Under a garden the gas pipe service should be 375mm deep and under a footway 450mm. The trench should usually be 200-300mm wide.


Sewer

Sewer lines from houses can be traced with a trace-wire, almost all sewer pipes are not pressurized, except for rare instances where the pipe is sewage transport from a waste management facility. Sewer mains like what all houses connect to in a street, the sydney water standard for “general” “non-roadways” service mains are depths of 450mm-650mm. Commercial pipes should be at depths of 600mm-700mm.

LOCATION INDICATIVE DESIGN COVER (mm) fo depth from ground surface to top of pipe barrel. https://www.sydneywater.com.au/web/groups/publicwebcontent/documents/document/zgrf/mdq2/~edisp/dd_046971.pdf

#Non-Roadways – General: 450-650mm -Industrial/Commercial: 600-700mm -Sealed Roads 600-700mm -Major Roadways/Embankments: 750mm -Freeways: 1200mm

Storm Water Drains

Tricky Storm water drains are usually small connection pipes to the mains in the street, where rainwater gets collected in the gutter of a street, then transported down to a storm-water main, where it goes into a ocean, river, lake or water recycle treatment plant.


WORK NEAR UNDERGROUND ASSETS – GUIDE SAFEWORK NSW 2007


WorkSafe NSW Regulatory Standards of depth of cover for buried utilities.


The short answer is, Utility lines can be buried at any depth. With the right knowledge and tools most underground utilities can be found. A good utility locator can find accurate depths of most service lines and conduits, however sometimes access issues and situations can make it difficult to get an exact location. You should get to know your regions standards for service utility depths.

Common situations with utility services such as electricity, gas, water, communications, Pipes and Cables are usually buried at a depth of 200 – 600mm beneath the surface. Sewer mains are usual the deepest service underground, private residential connections are usually not deep at all and usually have no standard depth.

These depths can very quite abit and can also extrude from places without signs or warning. Storm-water and sewage pipes are gravity feed, due to this, the flatter the region, the deeper they are so the pipes can run down hill to any waste water treatment facility or collection pump point.


Sewers and Enclosed Buried Storm Water

Conduits Because sewer and storm-water mains are generally designed for gravity flow, there is no standard depth at which they are constructed. For each and every situation, design depth (and hence cover) needs to be obtained and confirmed from Sydney Water plans and utility locators findings.

Different regions have different standards, below are the standards (examples) of utility service depth levels in New South Wales, Australia. Some surfaces are changed over time due to development and weathering, which would effect the original depth level of those utilities.

Conduits Because sewer and storm-water mains are generally designed for gravity flow, there is no standard depth at which they are constructed. For each and every situation, design depth (and hence cover) needs to be obtained and confirmed from Sydney Water plans and utility locators findings.

Different regions have different standards, below are the standards (examples) of utility service depth levels in New South Wales, Australia. Some surfaces are changed over time due to development and weathering, which would effect the original depth level of those utilities.


Source:

https://www.safework.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0009/54378/SW08773-Work-near-underground-assets-guide.pdf

https://www.safework.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0009/54378/SW08773-Work-near-underground-assets-guide.pdf

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Recent Posts